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Mechanical Television: Incredibly simple, yet entirely bonkers

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In my last video, we explored how analog television
works. You can check out the whole video either through
this card or through the link in the description, but here’s a brief overview. At its core, analog television is just an
amplitude modulated radio transmission where the strength of the signal dictates brightness
of a light source, with a strong signal producing a bright light, and a weak signal producing
little to no light. The television set uses an electromagnet to
deflect the source of the light, an electron beam, in a pattern called a raster, which
is really just a ton of horizontal lines. This has the effect of producing a glowing
series of lines on the face of a picture tube. The electronics of the TV set line up the
incoming signal with the movement of the beam to create an image, with each part of the
imaging being drawn brightly or darkly along with the signal’s instantaneous strength. With everything in alignment, you get an image. By far the most complicated part of making
an image appear on the screen is making that raster pattern. The electronic components and other crucial
parts such as the picture tube and deflection yoke are primitive by today’s standards,
but still pretty complicated. We really just need a way make a repeating
pattern of lines from a light source, there’s got to be a simpler way to do it! Enter: Mechanical Television. The earliest televisions actually got some
of their inspiration from fax machines, really?, and relied on a couple of important developments. So first a bit about the fax machines. Facsimile transmission actually predates the
telephone? (what?), with images such as signatures being
commercially reproduced over telegraph wires as far back as 1865, and the earliest fax-like
device being invented by Scottish inventor Alexander Bain in 1846. Now, I’m simplifying a great deal here,
but the theory was that if you could synchronize the movement of a scanning device with a drawing
device, you could replicate an image. If you scanned a piece of paper line by line
and sent a signal over a wire to match the darkness of the ink, you could reproduce the
image by syncing up a drawing mechanism with the scanning one. These early fax machines worked, but they
were very slow. Nevertheless, they showed us that you could,
via electro-mechanical means, reproduce an image. Fast forward to 1884, and 23-year old Paul
Julius Gottlieb Nipkow created the Nipkow disc. This is the core of most mechanical television
systems. Nipkow realized that a spinning disc could
methodically scan an image line-by-line simply by placing evenly-spaced holes in a spiral
pattern. This is a home-made Nipkow disc. I took a really awful vinyl record that I’d
be happy to destroy, and marked 32 divisions around the circumference, like 32 very skinny
pie slices. Then I methodically drilled a hole along these
lines, with each hole being drilled a 32nd of an inch (roughly .8 milimeters) closer
to the center than the last. The result is a spiral pattern of holes. This might not seem like much, but it’s
actually extremely clever. If you put a square-ish shaped mask in front
of the holes, its height being slightly less than the distance between the holes, you’ve
made a device which mechanically creates a raster scan using these physical holes. John Logie Baird realized that with this Nipkow
disc, you could in theory focus an image with a lens onto the disc, and you could use a
light sensor to give an instantaneous reading of how bright each part of the image was,
with the holes in the nipkow disc serving as a way to divide the image into transmittable
pieces. Back in 1873, Willoughby Smith discovered
the photoconductivity of selenium, and with this knowledge Baird used some selenium to
create the light sensor for his televisor. I’ve mounted this Nipkow disc to an AC motor
which will spin it at 1,800 RPM, giving a complete revolution 30 times per second. Before I turn it on, look through the mask. I’ve put an extremely bright LED behind
the disc so you can see the holes. As I slowly turn the disc, you’ll see that
only one hole is visible at a time, and each hole gets closer to the left than the next
one. When I switch the motor on, the holes blend
into a moving line, and as it gets faster, the line seems to widen into a square. This square is very uneven because my homemade
Nipkow disc was made hastily and with poor precision. But here’s the key. Only one of the holes is actually visible
through the mask at any given moment. It’s just moving too fast to see. Baird used the selenium light sensor to create
a signal from an image being scanned by the disc, and on the receiving end, another identical
disc would spin at precisely the same speed, and a light source such as a neon lamp would
vary its brightness along with the signal strength presented by the light sensor, and
thus, you’d get an image. I shall now attempt to show you how this worked. Now before you get too excited, I’ll admit
that my mechanical television doesn’t work as well as I had hoped. And that’s all on my insistence in using
crap I had laying around, rather than going through the process to make a proper LED driver. However, I hope you’ll get an understanding
of what’s going on. This 10W LED chip is what we’ll use as a
light source. It’s really bright and, importantly, it
can react very quickly to changes in the voltage it receives. First, I’ll simply power the LED continuously. As the disc spins up, the lines start to blend
into each other, and eventually the whole “screen” is illuminated. Now, I’m going to switch the LED on and
off at a higher and higher frequency. First, 5 hz. The screen appears to just be flashing, nothing
too extraordinary, but you might be able to see some odd stuff happening as the light
switches states. Now I’ll switch it on and off at 60 hz. Something odd starts to be visible here. See, the disc makes a complete revolution
30 times per second, and with the light flashing at twice that frequency, only some of the
holes are lit up as the disc passes over the LED. Now let’s move to 1,800 hz. Frequencies that are a multiple of 30 will
appear stable as an even number of pulses fit within each revolution. If you mess with that, though, things get
weird. Bumping the frequency up just a tad makes
the pattern move in relation to the disc. The holes in the disc are directly responsible
for creating the patterns you see. Without the disc, the LED appears to just
be continuously illuminated. But, it’s not. It’s flashing really quickly. The disc allows for that flashing to be visible
because it physically obscures different parts of the light source over time. This is just like the electron beam in the
CRT television, except instead of electromagnets moving a beam across the surface of a picture
tube, the light source is physically moved via the location of these holes. It’s a pretty crafty way of producing a
raster scan, and it actually works. This is the best imagery I could get my televisor
to produce. This pattern was generated through manipulating
audio samples in Audacity. To give you an idea of how poorly this mechanical
TV works, well the image I intended to make was not a map of the world as this vaguely
suggests, but that of a circle. Here’s a look at true video. What you’re seeing here is a very low contrast,
very low resolution image of Seth Meyers. I mean obviously, how could you not recognize
him? Yeah OK, it’s garbage, but you can see that
there is certainly something there and it’s moving slightly. Like a talk show host’s head might when
said talk show host is talking. On his show. To make this image, I simply placed my phone
behind the televisor with the screen brightness all the way up, and I placed this solar panel
with an audio cord patched into it into one of my trusty Tascam DR-05 audio recorders,
which I use all the time. In fact there’s one in my pocket right now. And yes, that’s directly from a solar garden
light. The solar panel would produce a high current
whenever it saw bright light, and it would produce low current with less light. Duh. As the disc spun, it would only allow the
tiniest bit of the image through to the solar panel at any given time. This would produce a quickly varying signal
with amplitude corresponding to image brightness. The TASCAM would just encode these relative
brightnesses as sound samples, at a sample rate of 48 kilohertz, and then because I’m
really lazy, I just hooked my LED into an audio amplifier and played that sound back. The LED would become brighter with a stronger
signal from the amplifier, though as it’s a diode it would filter out any AC components
of the signal. Quite honestly I’m amazed it produces anything
at all. I opened the file in Audacity just to see
what it looked like, and it’s pretty intriguing. Here’s what it sounds like, for those interested. Now, in case it’s not obvious, let’s go
over the reasons mechanical television didn’t catch on. First, up until now, I’ve not let you hear
what this sounds like. Here’s what a 12 inch vinyl disc sounds
like at 1,800 RPM. I’m sure that would never get old. But aside from that, there are just so many
practical concerns with mechanical TV. First of all, the image is tiny. And it’s a horribly low resolution–only
32 lines. That’s the only reason a signal can be recorded
as an audio file. Not a lot of bandwidth is needed. Because the disc obscures almost all of the
light source, hardly any light gets through. This LED is fricken bright, it’s painful
to look at directly, and yet through the Nipkow disc, nearly all of the light is blocked,
and it produces a dull image. When these devices were first in development,
the light source would often be a neon lamp, like the orange light in a powerstrip’s
switch. Imagine how dark the image would be with only
that for a light source. One of the biggest troubles with mechanical
television is image synchronization. Because we’re using a big spinning thing
to divide the light into chunks, the disc has to be in precisely the right place if
you want the image to land where it should. If we take the mask away, you can see that
the image just repeats itself over and over. But each adjacent image is actually shifted
one line up or down. The most critical part of synchronization
was ensuring the disc is spinning at the exact same speed as the scanning disc of a camera,
but it would also be necessary to slow down or speed up the disc in slight increments
to get the image aligned with the viewing mask, and with the top and bottom in the right
place. But the most damning problem is that of geometry. Imagine we wanted to make a display with the
resolution and size of this small CRT television. Well, the face of the tube is about 15 cm
wide. With 480 lines of resolution, there would
need to be 480 holes in the nipkow disc. Remember, only one hole can be seen through
the mask at once for this to work, so the holes have to be at a minimum 15 centimeters
apart. So the disc’s circumference would have to
be 72 meters, with a diameter of roughly 23 meters, or about 75 feet. I live in a building that’s 6 stories tall. A mechanical television to rival this TV would
be taller than my building! And, it would have to spin at 1,800 RPM just
like this one to make 30 frames per second possible. This things scares me spinning this fast. I’m pretty sure a 75 foot disc would just
explode. In fact, let’s do the math. A 72 meter circumference means that the edge
of the disc would travel 2.160 kilometers per second, or well above mach 6. Yeah. If the disc were rolling, it would make it
from New York to Los Angeles in about 35 minutes–not in a straight line, mind you, but by traveling
along actual roads. So, the Baird television system didn’t get
too far. It was certainly genious and is an important
part of the history of television. But is was far too limited, clunky, and, to
be honest, it had crappy image quality. I’ve added some links in the description
to videos of mechanical televisions that actually work, and I think you’ll agree that’s
they’re pretty cool, but it’s a damn good thing they didn’t become mainstream. As always, thank you so much for watching. If you liked this video, a thumbs up would
be most appreciated. I’m absolutely thrilled that this channel
has over 21,000 subscribers now! I never thought that would be possibl. If you’re not one of the people in that
number, and you liked this video, I humbly ask that you become one of them by pressing
that subscribe button. I’m doing my best to keep videos like this
headed your way, and I’ll see you next time!

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100 thoughts on “Mechanical Television: Incredibly simple, yet entirely bonkers”

  1. Phredreeke says:

    Didn't analog TV (except for France who always has to do things the other way around compared to the rest of the world) use negative modulation and as such the image would become darker as stronger the amplitude is?

  2. shadow dog says:

    There were a lot of variations, the most promising was a pair of disks with a prism edge. One disk handled horizontal scanning the 2nd disk vertical.

  3. shadow dog says:

    To synchronize the disks they developed a system of electrically driven tuning forks for timing, until the development of quartz crystals this was the best system for clock accuracy.
    The first electronic wrist watches in the 1960s used tiny tuning forks.

  4. TheOfficialCzex says:

    75' records are the next Concorde.

  5. Patrick Swafford says:

    I really appreciate the epilepsy warnings in your videos. In my opinion it should be standard on YouTube if not everywhere.

  6. J S says:

    Mechanical tv.. did take off, for projectors.
    It was superseded by spinning mirrors, later vibrating mirrors.
    The decedents to mechanical tv is the mem mirror projector.

  7. TalenGryphon says:

    Thank you so much for making this video. The mechanical TV technology itself was obviously hopeless, but it did manage to finally answer for me how old TVs full of diodes, ICs, and resistors still qualified as "Analog"

  8. Mohammed Azeem says:

    Awesome 👍
    You are my master now 🙏

  9. grogtgs says:

    that album isn't that bad. you can hear it : youtube.com/watch?v=EHRY670rlgA

  10. MetaSynForYourSoul says:

    Facsimile transmission predates the telephone. Sometimes you learn new facts, sometimes they BLOW OUT THE BACK OF YOUR SKULL! 🤯

  11. PapaWheelie says:

    I’m still convinced this is how we would be watching tv if it was not for porn.

  12. codemiesterbeats says:

    4:57 I think I just understood why we call it a "screen" lol I never knew these even existed… pretty darn interesting.

  13. Cat says:

    Got a little more than 22k subs now, don't ya
    Huh

  14. d fella says:

    I tried this as well and found that recording from a phone screen or computer screen in my case doesn't work
    But I aimed some studio lights on me and filmed myself and got way better results
    The sync was off but I could clearly make out my outline
    Plus I was using an 8 hole disc for testing so I would think you'd get better results on a 30 hole disc

  15. Az Antifizikus says:

    Nice video bro 👍

  16. greggv8 says:

    Philo Farnsworth tried to help Baird, but Baird stubbornly stuck to his mechanical system. Later, when Farnsworth was fighting with RCA to keep them from stealing his invention, there was to be a demonstration of Farnsworth's all electric television in the Crystal Palace, which burned almost completely after a fire started in the women's cloakroom. Baird's TV stuff was also in there and mostly destroyed. Back then RCA never licensed a patent. If they didn't invent a thing but wanted it, they'd try to buy exclusive rights for a one time payment. If the patent holder refused, RCA would just steal the idea and start making it, using their huge amounts of money to out spend legal challenges from patent holders.

    Farnsworth was the first inventor who would not be bought nor bullied by RCA. Their last effort to "prove" their guy, Vladimir K. Zworykin, had "invented" electronic television (coincidentally shortly after Farnsworth had given him a tour of his laboratory) was to put together a team who had never worked on television and told them to make Zworykin patent work. What they came back with was essentially identical to Farnsworth's version because it was the only way they could make it work.

    RCA, for the first time ever, licensed a patent. But they'd dragged things out so long they didn't have to pay Farnsworth for very many years before his patent expired. For a long time after, RCA would promote the idea that they had invented television, while Farnsworth's own TV equipment manufacturing company foundered. RCA did develop the color TV standard that was compatible with then current monocrhome receivers, after CBS' incompatible color system was rejected by the NTSC.

  17. greggv8 says:

    Philo Farnsworth tried to help Baird, but Baird stubbornly stuck to his mechanical system. Later, when Farnsworth was fighting with RCA to keep them from stealing his invention, there was to be a demonstration of Farnsworth's all electric television in the Crystal Palace, which burned almost completely after a fire started in the women's cloakroom. Baird's TV stuff was also in there and mostly destroyed. Back then RCA never licensed a patent. If they didn't invent a thing but wanted it, they'd try to buy exclusive rights for a one time payment. If the patent holder refused, RCA would just steal the idea and start making it, using their huge amounts of money to out spend legal challenges from patent holders.

    Farnsworth was the first inventor who would not be bought nor bullied by RCA. Their last effort to "prove" their guy, Vladimir K. Zworykin, had "invented" electronic television (coincidentally shortly after Farnsworth had given him a tour of his laboratory) was to put together a team who had never worked on television and told them to make Zworykin patent work. What they came back with was essentially identical to Farnsworth's version because it was the only way they could make it work.

    RCA, for the first time ever, licensed a patent. But they'd dragged things out so long they didn't have to pay Farnsworth for very many years before his patent expired. For a long time after, RCA would promote the idea that they had invented television, while Farnsworth's own TV equipment manufacturing company foundered. RCA did develop the color TV standard that was compatible with then current monocrhome receivers, after CBS' incompatible color system was rejected by the NTSC.

  18. Joshua McGinty says:

    That record wasn't that bad.

  19. Boosted Doge says:

    Why am I so fascinated by old tech

  20. Sophia Cristina says:

    I discovered your channel recently and love the technicality of your talk.

  21. Mike Rogge says:

    William Osman tried and failed to build a mechanical TV after his TV mysteriously filled with bees.

  22. Emerson-Biggons says:

    Wow 21k subs! Already?!

  23. Melkior Wiseman says:

    Last I knew, there was a demonstration system (using about a 2 inch or smaller screen) using this technology in the Melbourne Science Museum in Australia. You push a button to start the discs spinning and make the low-resolution image appear.
    For some reason, the light used is red and all you can see while the discs are stopped is a single red dot.

  24. Dirk-Ulrich Heise says:

    Great that you tried to build one! Here's an idea: Similar to incremental sensors (mouse wheels in mechanical mice), where, instead of using holes, high precision sensors use reflection of a light beam and etch tiny equidistant strips on a glass disk, it might be possible to use the same trick here; and, what would happen if you shrink the mechanics down into the microscale, using MEMS tech.

  25. Charley B says:

    So does the LP still play?

  26. Stephen Williams says:

    Ham radio uses a system and its called marrow band. Some times at night old timers and young alike send video flying spot style. de kv4li

  27. Catman says:

    You should collab with William Osman! He tried to get a mechanical TV working before his house burned down, and got about 80% there.

  28. kevin bruck says:

    What the fuck ,fucking bored video

  29. peanutaxis says:

    HeloooOOooooooo!!

  30. Sir Alexander says:

    Never knew this, it's awesome

  31. ReddFoxx1562 says:

    This may be the best explanation of how a television works out of the dozens of times I've heard one, but I still find a huge portion of these types of things to be magic.

  32. user 9429450 says:

    Hilariously painful technology but still clever

  33. CockatooDude says:

    Watching a fax machine working its magic in the mid 1800's must have really been something, like damn.

  34. FreshRot says:

    Instead of using a giant disc, would more spirals help?

  35. Chris Mayer says:

    I may not understand you, but I do like you!

  36. Só Aviões says:

    Good video. Very nice explanation.

  37. Dave Goldspink says:

    Great video I found it obviously very interesting. Great job.

  38. ReimusKlinsman says:

    Congrats on getting 21k subscribers. It looks like each one of them thumbs upped this video

  39. professormohawk1 says:

    huh, thats actually kinda neat

  40. Jon Jonas says:

    Tv was invented by a white person Farnsworth and everything was invented by a white person see white lives matter

  41. Stephen Glarvey says:

    Kun fu panda

  42. Monty Waggoner says:

    Only 22k subscribers? What's everyone else watching? I assumed it was 2.2 million or so.

  43. Gary Groeneweg says:

    In Australian schools, we were always drilled into accepting the "fact" that it was John Logie Baird who invented the television. This belief is further reinforced by Australia's annual television industry awards night, the Logie Awards. The most prestigious award is the Gold Logie, given to Australia's most popular z-list celebrity each year after a public poll… No one is awarded the Gold Zworykin. Vladimir Zworykin's pioneering contribution to the development of electronic television was to use a cathode ray tube instead of a mechanical flywheel to produce the scan lines. His proof of concept was demonstrated during the same period that Baird was trying to promote his evolutionary dead-end.

    Thank you so much for your enlightening demonstration of the Baird device, I have a much better understanding of how brilliant and unfortunate his invention truly was. Amazing!

  44. Connor Irwin says:

    Actually it’s 373,326K subscribers! Congrats!

  45. Aaron Trupiano says:

    why not make the disc into a belt

  46. kargaroc386 says:

    And yeah, importing that signal into virtualdub (eliminating any errors with the mechanical playback system) reveals that there's barely anything there
    I mean sure it's compressed with AAC but you'd expect something to be there.
    The closest I could manage was a slowly rolling and skewed blur of white.

  47. Paul Mansfield says:

    Years ago I went to a ham radio club where people were experimenting with slow scan tv, and some had made mechanical tvs just like yours. They would transmit live tv to each other over radio. Brilliant, but also batshit crazy!

  48. Rebel9668 says:

    Yeah it was primitive and clunky but isn't everything in the eyes of history? 100+ years from now I wonder how many of the devices we think of as new and outstanding will be considered primitive and clunky, but you have to start somewhere. I knew about mechanical tv from having used to have owned a book called 100 years of Popular Science. Pretty neat to see it in actual operation though. There's an old movie from the mid 30's with W.C. Fields called international House where a man is trying to sell his invention he calls a Radioscope which resembles an early type of television too.

  49. Mike Anderson says:

    American Caravan 2 is my all time favorite record 🙁
    I'll be crying in the corner.

  50. Master Baiter says:

    Everything I touch seem to flourish. You're welcome. Can you confirm your stats when I'm watching ur video? It could be a coincidence but what if if some certain people watch your videos and a random problem in the world is solved? Like shared brain energy on some different scale

  51. bledlbledlbledl says:

    Are all of your videos linked together or something in a way that's designed to manipulate youtube?
    Just as soon as I clicked on the first of your videos that I had ever clicked on, immediately the video thumbnails youtube is showing me (on the right side of the screen) are all yours.

  52. Tarototh says:

    after watching a few of your interesting retro tech videos, i thought you made pretty good content… then i found THIS super captivating video with not only interesting tech but FASCINATING history!!!!! subscribing now.

  53. Rothron says:

    LED brightness doesn't scale linearly with applied voltage. Dimmable LEDs uses fast duty-cycling to appear less bright. This is probably why your image looks binary.

  54. kaczan3 says:

    I bet hipsters will soon be watching mechanical TV.

  55. A Very Long Straw says:

    🅱️ersistence of vision

  56. Alexander Krivács Schrøder says:

    21k subscribers, huh? Dead giveaway that this video is quite old. 😅

  57. Ratcat17 says:

    Thats what the Logies (Australias Oscars) are named after – John Logie Baird.

  58. Дмитрий Куртуков says:

    less words more action

  59. Michal Nemecek says:

    I don't know why, but I thought of a solution to the geometry problem. Just use a loop of tape going around many cylinders, so that it fits in a small box that is not taller than a building, and make the back side white to prevent the tape from heating up too much and stretching from the lamp behind it. It still doesn't fix the speed problem, though.

  60. Jackson Gresh says:

    Could you make a very unreliable secretary system using a sensitive solar panel and a mechanical television ?

  61. Cristaliana Ivor says:

    Funny to see that this concept got recycled to make spinning usb fans that show the current time. Instead of having a rotating disc with holes tho, the leds are on the fan rotors

  62. Billy Bob says:

    That was very interesting, thank you!

  63. nikulaye says:

    what if you use more disks ?

  64. Rhubarb Pie says:

    When your HD mechanical TV gets loose and takes out half the neighborhood before rolling into the ocean.

  65. Michael Walsh says:

    I would just as soon not see Seth Meyers anyway

  66. rager1969 says:

    I watched this video when it was new and decided to watch it agian. Holy crap, you've jumped from 22K subscribers to 424K in just two years! Well done, sir.

  67. Gadget :p says:

    Just a stupid question, and yes it probably is, but how does someone that has 428K subscribers only get 23K likes on a nearly 2 year old upload??? 🤔🤔🤔

  68. Scudmaster11 says:

    The sound board sound so interesting

  69. Driftliketokyo34 Ftw says:

    I kinda like how a 12 inch record spinning at 1800 RPM sounds. don’t know why.

  70. PplsChampion says:

    as a university assignment we had to build a system similar to this (including a little line of sight transmitter)… yours came out way better

  71. Sarah Rawson says:

    Holy MERP! I think I have the exact same TV!

  72. TheGmr140 says:

    really nice video
    see my channel for radio videos

  73. Adam Churvis says:

    Renowned Canadian detective William Murdoch invented this in an episode of Murdoch Mysteries. Come to think of it, Murdoch invented virtually EVERY major technology we use today.

  74. sochyvonn nora says:

    From william osman

  75. Una Salus Victis says:

    smaller dots, more disks are also possible, we have the electronics to do it, i would love to see somebody make a projector using tech like this, use smaller holes, and more of them for higher res, im actually now starting to wonder if this could be done and create a higher res image at a lower production cost, then lcd/led based projectors have managed so far…. it would be an interesting experiment for somebody to work on… back in the day, i would have been that person…..

    as to colors, i have seen examples of this that had color…. newer and made by geeks…but… the idea… neat…

    also, you can lower the rpm's via smaller holes closer togather, pack that data tighter and use a magnification to get the size you are looking for.

  76. FeedEgg says:

    i actually like the sound that thing makes, sounds like a goddamn spaceship powering up or something.

  77. Алексей Рукин says:

    Several Soviet models of calculators used this principle to display numbers! One difference was that these holes were number-shaped and not round or square.

  78. Nathaniel Harari says:

    I can just imagine Grampa Simpson shaking his fist at everyone here and saying something like "Eehhhh! You kids and yer plasma TVs are just a fad! Mechanical TVs are gonna come back! Yer'll see!" 😀

  79. Brine Gill says:

    At 8:10 it sounds almost identical to sitting underneath the transmission of a uh60m Blackhawk helicopter.

  80. 1998guys :D says:

    8:36 it sounds like an 80s pc running 3d graphics

  81. Zero Promises says:

    I feel like if the initial concept involved the use of a belt and not a rotating disc, this idea could have actually caught on.

  82. Alan Mangroo says:

    Awesome!

  83. Cydney Alexis says:

    cool content, but you speak WAY TOO fast! I can't show your videos to my students because there is no way they could follow; I can barely follow! It would be awesome if you could slow down in your delivery!

  84. dingo says:

    I wonder how good mechanical TV could have got if electronic hadn't been invented. I know there was the Scophony system before the war, which could do over 400 lines and project an image several feet across. Could we have ended up with 1080p sets with spinning mirrors? The limitations you talk about in the video really only apply to Nipkow discs.

  85. Whoop says:

    Yeah it has poor resolution and it's loud, but it is efficient if you want to use a circular saw and watch low quality tv at the same time!

  86. theshuman100 says:

    my man really be named john yogi bear

  87. Jaekoff says:

    I'd like to see this revisited.

  88. L1nkk9E says:

    Congratz to 20k!

  89. Butla Octu says:

    If image is 32 lines why don’t use moving tape instead of dość?

  90. slightlyevolved says:

    If anyone is interested in this, typically, unmentioned time of television development, I highly recommend checking out a book called, Please Stand By: The Prehistory of Television

  91. Coleman Adamson says:

    The size of that LED heat sink is enormous!

  92. User 007513 says:

    You're doing the Lord's work on this channel

  93. J- Man says:

    06:40 IDK about Meyers, I do see Chris Penn tho!

  94. PeerensClement says:

    this is simply fascinating!

  95. tobroken1965 says:

    Its an updated Zoopraxiscope.

  96. Edy Salt says:

    It's amazing how im not subscribed but I watch your videos all the time anyways

  97. Sheila olfieWay says:

    mechanicle television also had the first color TV!

  98. Phroggster says:

    Watching and commenting again 2 years later just because your back catalog is still so hot. Holy smokes though; from 22k subs to (let's round up) 500k in two years? That's a lot of lives that you've improved. Bravo!

  99. Donald Sayers says:

    It of course can be done with rotating mirrors and laser beams. Whereas a CRT uses a flywheel oscillator to generate a stable raster, a mirror scanning TV uses just a flywheel.

  100. Ben There Done That says:

    Even William Osman made a better mechanical TV than you, I’m surprised.

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